Concord Chapel Animal Hospital

"Caring for Pets and Their People"

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR STARS CALL 614-871-1111 OR WRITE ccahteam@gmail.com

Our Stars Of The Month | our collection of unique and interesting cases


Our Star: Zeke Wemliger


Zeke is a two year old male neutered Chihuahua mix who came to Concord Chapel because he was not acting normally and did not want to eat his food.  Dr. Schnader was concerned that Zeke may have eaten something he shouldn’t have and had x-rays taken of Zeke’s abdomen.  The x-rays showed a quarter complete with George Washington’s face in Zeke’s small intestine.  Zeke had blood work taken which was normal.  Zeke was placed on IV fluids, stomach protectants, antibiotics, and medications to stop vomiting.  He was then taken to surgery.  Lucky for Zeke, the quarter had traveled far enough that it was pushed into his colon and was removed rectally.  After seeing some “change” in Zeke, he was sent home.



Our Star: Charlie E.


Charlie is a young male neutered cat that may have eaten or inhaled something that he shouldn’t have.  Whatever the caustic material was (he is not telling) caused the back of his throat to be severely inflamed and necrotic.  He was very painful, holding his mouth open, wheezing, and vomiting.  Toby was hospitalized at CCAH on fluids, pain meds, and stomach protectants.  He was not doing much better the next day and was sent to MedVet.  After a throat biopsy and two more days of hospitalization with a feeding tube, Charlie was doing much better.  He was sent home breathing normally and eating on his own.  He still was not meowing normally, however.  We hope Toby has learned his lesson and stays out of trouble in the future.



Our Star: Kirby Hand


Kirby was a beloved 11 year old schnauzer who had been visiting us at Concord Chapel since he was a puppy.  Kirby had a pretty uneventful 8 years until he was diagnosed with bladder stones.  He had surgery to remove those stones and was placed on special food in order to prevent more stones from forming.  He did well for 2 years and was then diagnosed with high blood sugar (diabetes).  Like bladder stones, diabetes is a common disease diagnosed in miniature schnauzers.  

Kirby was placed on insulin twice daily and did relatively well for 6 months. However, Kirby started to lose weight. One of his liver values was high, he developed a heart murmur, and again had bladder stones as well as kidney stones. Despite multiple tests and medications, Kirby continued to get worse.  Kirby no longer had a good quality of life and his owner ultimately decided to euthanize Kirby.  Kirby was always a good boy and a very special companion to his owner.  We are sure that Kirby is currently up in doggy heaven romping around, chasing little critters and eating anything he wants.  Kirby will be truly missed.  Rest in peace, Kirby. 

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Our Star: Meep


Meep is a 6.5 year old male neutered domestic short hair.  When he was about 12 weeks old, his ear drum in his left ear ruptured and his ear became infected.  At that time, we took x-rays of his head to look for abnormalities in his ear.  A nasal pharyngeal polyp was diagnosed at that time.  These types of polyps are common in cats.  They are usually located at the back of the throat, above the soft pallet, or in the middle ear.  Meep’s infection resolved and his ear drum healed.  Six years later, Meep developed a head tilt to the left.  Over 3 weeks the tilt became worse.  Then he started having balance problems and was walking around like he was drunk.  When these symptoms are present in an animal the ear is one of the first places you look.   Meep’s ear drum was still intact, but it was bulging, glossy, and appeared to have fluid behind it.  Meep’s previous history and his current symptoms suggested that he had something going on in his middle ear.  The best way to get to the middle ear is to do a surgical procedure called a bulla osteotomy. 


Meep was taken to MedVet in Worthington.  He was examined by Dr. Kennedy who agreed that surgically investigating Meep’s inner ear was the best course of action.  Meep was taken to surgery the next day.  During the surgery, Dr. Kennedy did not find a polyp.  Instead Meep had an infection and extra tissue in his ear caused by the infection.  This tissue was debrided and sent out to a lab for histopathology.  Pus found in the middle ear was cultured and also sent to the lab. This test will determine what kind of bacteria was in the ear and will help to make sure Meep was placed on the correct antibiotics.

Meep is doing well at home on antibiotics and pain medications.  He is no longer wobbly and his head tilt is resolving.  Meep can’t wait to get his e-collar off, his stitches out, and play with his three feline and two canine friends that share the house with him

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Our Star: Kala


Kala is a 3 year old female spayed Australian Cattle Dog who was attacked by another dog.  Her right shoulder ended up with a very large, deep bite wound. This wound was so deep it tore through a muscle!  Kala was placed under anesthesia and her wounds were cleaned and the muscle repaired.  A drain was placed in the wound and the wound was sutured and stapled back together.  Kala was placed on pain medication and antibiotics.  Soon after her surgery, Kala’s wound broke open due to infection.  A second surgery was performed to remove pus and dead tissue.  The wound was left open and Kala was started on daily sugar treatments. That’s right, table sugar, the same stuff you would bake a cake with or put in your coffee, was packed into the wound.  Sugar packed into a wound prevents bacterial growth and promotes healing.  After 14 days of sugar treatments, Kala’s wound was almost completely healed.  Kala is doing very well at home.  She is walking normally and is eagerly waiting to be able to run and play again!


Purina EN

Purina EN is a bland diet used for patients experiencing GI symptoms such as vomiting or diarrhea.  Feeding a bland diet such as Purina EN to your pet is equivalent to a human eating toast, crackers, or chicken noodle soup after being sick.  Purina EN supplies your dog or cat’s GI system with a healthy protein and carbohydrate source while giving the stomach and intestines a chance to heal.



Our Star Guinness


   Guinness is a 5 year old male tabby cat with a history of a heart murmur and chronic vomiting of an unknown cause.  Guinness has been a little unlucky when it comes to his health.  In early August, Guinness was again faced with a health scare when he was having difficulty urinating.  He went to MedVet on emergency and was hospitalized for his problem.  

   When he was feeling better he was released.  However, Guinness did not do very well at home.  He would not eat and again had issues urinating.  Guinness was brought to Concord Chapel Animal Hospital.  At the time of admission, Guinness could not urinate and he was dehydrated.  Guinness was again placed on IV fluids and had a urinary catheter placed to help him urinate.  

   MedVet had performed a urine culture and sensitivity test while Guinness was in their care.  This test takes several days to complete and Guinness was already home when the results came back.  The culture grew an odd bacteria, one that could be considered an environmental contaminant.  

   Since Guinness was having so many problems, we decided to treat Guinness for this bacteria.  We also started Guinness on stomach protectants and appetite stimulants due to his chronic GI issues and because he was not eating.  Guinness stayed at CCAH for 4 days.  

   Over that time he started to feel much better and finally went home on several medications to help him eat, urinate, and to treat his urinary tract infection.  Guinness was diagnosed with two disease: Feline Interstitial Cystitis (FIC) and a urinary tract infection (UTI).  

   Guinness continues to do well at home and again proves the adage that cats truly have nine lives. 


Meet Our Star: Sneezy


Sneezy is a young female barn cat.  Like many unspayed female cats, Sneezy went into heat this spring and became pregnant.  Approximately 63 days later, Sneezy went into labor and started giving birth to her kittens.  Sneezy had 3 kittens before she started having problems.  Her fourth kitten was coming out rear end first and got stuck.  When her owner’s found her, one of the three kittens was dead and Sneezy had a kitten leg sticking out of her. 


Sneezy’s owners knew she was in trouble and brought her to Concord Chapel for evaluation.  Dr. Schmidt performed a physical exam on Sneezy and determined that the stuck kitten was not alive.  In fact Sneezy had a uterine infection and fever due to the mal positioned fetus.  Dr. Schmidt had an x-ray taken of Sneezy.  This x-ray showed that the kitten stuck inside her was very large and, therefore too big to fit through Sneezy’s birth canal. 


Sneezy was placed on IV fluids, pain medication, and antibiotics.  She was then taken to surgery where she was spayed and had the remaining kitten removed.  Sneezy is doing very well and was nursing her remaining kittens about 1 hour after surgery!  Sneezy is one tough and lucky little girl!


Meet our Star Murph: JANUARY 2015


Murph is a 1 year old male neutered Wheaton terrier. A strange hole was found in Murph’s mouth during a routine yearly exam. This hole extended from behind the upper canine on the inside of his mouth to the outside of his mouth in front of the canine as seen in the picture.


Murph may have injured himself while chewing on some wicker and a button. Murph was treated with antibiotics and a disinfectant oral rinse. As of December 18th of 2015, the hole on the outside of Murph’s gums had healed and the hole on the inside of his mouth was still in the process of healing.


Murph’s owner says he is doing well at home and is eating, playing, and acting like his normal self. Murph’s mouth will be reevaluated in mid-January to make sure that the defect on the inside of his mouth has completely closed.


TIGER: NOVEMBER 2015


Tiger is a super friendly, 7 year old, male dachshund who came to Concord Chapel in later September because his teeth were very bad and his breath smelled. During Tiger’s initial appointment with Dr. Kerr, she noticed that not only were Tiger’s teeth covered in tartar, there were holes in the gums behind both upper canine teeth. It was suspected that these holes were oronasal fistulas. These fistulas are defects through the gum and bone that leads to a connection between the mouth and the nose.


Oronasal fistulas are relatively common and are seen typically in dogs with periodontal disease (inflammation of the tissues surrounding the teeth which can lead to loss of the bone and soft tissue around the tooth). However, trauma such as being hit by a car can also cause these defects. Oronasal fistulas need to be closed as they can lead to trapping of food and debris in the nasal cavity and then respiratory infections.


Tiger’s owners scheduled him for a surgery to remove his diseased teeth, close the oronasal fistulas, and neuter him. Oronasal fistulas can be difficult to close due to the infection and diseased tissue that are within the fistula. Sometimes, even after cleaning out the fistulas and good surgical, the fistulas can reopen leading to the need of a second surgery to correct the fistulas. Tiger was started on antibiotics prior to his surgery. Tiger’s blood work prior to surgery looked very good. Tiger also had an IV catheter placed and was placed on fluids prior to his surgery.


Unfortunately for Tiger, his teeth were so diseased that most of them needed to be removed. Large flaps were made in Tiger’s gums so that the gums could be pulled over the areas where the teeth were removed and to close the oronasal fistulas that were definitely present in the upper jaw. These flaps were closed with absorbable suture which is important since these sutures are inside the mouth. The neutering portion of the surgery also went well for Tiger. Tiger recovered from his surgery uneventfully. He was sent home on multiple types of pain medication and was continued on antibiotics.


Tiger’s owner was also told to feed Tiger soft food for 4 weeks and to keep Tiger from chewing on hard objects and toys so that the sutured gum flaps that were in his mouth would stay closed. Tiger’s mouth was reevaluated twice over the next 4 weeks. Both times it appeared that the gums were healing well and there were no reforming fistulas. Tiger may be toothless, but his mouth is now free of infection and Tiger is pain free. Tiger is back to his normal happy, tail wagging self!



Muffin | OCTOBER 2015


Muffin is 6 year old female spayed cat who came to us after taking a spin in a dryer, literally. Muffin most likely climbed into the open dryer while her owner was preparing to give the dog a bath. When Muffin’s owner went to dry the towels she used for the dogs bath, she did not notice Muffin in the dark dryer.


The dryer was turned on while Muffin was inside and she rode around with the laundry unbeknownst to her owner for 15 minutes. After Muffin was found, she was immediately brought to Concord Chapel because she was very warm and panting heavily. When Muffin was examined, her temperature was 106 degrees which is at least 3 degrees above normal. Muffin’s gums were very red, and she was panting so hard she was having trouble breathing.


Additionally, Muffin’s lungs sounded harsh. It also appeared that she had a head injury as her pupils were different sizes and she was not as alert as a normal cat should be. The edges of Muffin’s ears had abrasions and were bleeding slightly. Muffin was immediately placed on oxygen and IV fluids. The fluids would help cool her down as would the alcohol that was placed on her foot pads. An ice pack was also wrapped in a towel, and Muffin was laid on it. Within 30 minutes, Muffin’s temperature had dropped 3 degrees, and she was almost normal.


We recommended that Muffin have x-rays taken of her body to look for any bony injuries that could not be felt as well as to get a look at her harsh sounding lungs. We also recommended a complete blood count and profile to make sure there was no internal bleeding or organ trauma. Unfortunately, due to financial constraints, we were unable to take x-rays and perform the full panel of blood work. Instead, we ran a blood panel that gave us fewer values, but it was enough to know that one liver value and Muffin’s blood sugar level were slightly elevated. We also found out that Muffin was not bleeding internally.


Muffin’s temperature was normal within an hour. Muffin was kept on fluids and in an oxygen cage throughout the day. She was placed on pain medication, and ointment was placed on her ear edges due to the abrasions. Muffin’s lung sounds remained harsh, but she stopped panting. It was assumed that Muffin’s lungs were bruised due to the trauma of the spinning dryer, and that the bruising was causing the harsh lung sounds. Muffin’s pupil sizes became normal in both eyes. She also seemed mentally normal. Muffin even ate for us that day despite having bruised lungs and a head injury.


Muffin was sent home and has done very well ever since. Muffin was re-examined after being at home for a week. Her lungs were still moderately harsh; however, she was breathing normally. Dryer accidents are fairly common in cats as they love to sleep in dark warm places. Muffin was a very lucky kitty to have survived her ride on the home version of the Tilt-O-Whirl, and her owners have learned to check the dryer for feline passengers prior to pushing the start button.




Zeus Ives 2004 – 2015


Zeus was a handsome, 11.5 year old, male neutered cat. Zeus spent much of his younger years sleeping on his cat bed above the cabinets in his favorite room, the kitchen. As you can imagine, Zeus was a good eater and spent much of his life on the hefty side. In fact if Zeus did not eat, something was terribly wrong.


Zeus had a few health problems along his road of life. In 2005 he was diagnosed with a polyp (an

abnormal piece of pink tissue) growing in his ear. This polyp caused multiple ear infections. This is a common problem in young cats which can sometimes lead to dizziness and head tilts as well as ear infections and upper respiratory symptoms. Lucky for Zeus, his ear polyp was removed and he no longer had ear infections.


Zeus also had some dental issues and needed multiple dental cleanings to keep his gums from becoming inflamed. Gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) is also common to cats especially since most cats do not receive at home dental care. Zeus’s gingivitis persisted despite the regular dental care he received at home.


In 2011 Zeus began to lose weight. Remember Zeus was always a bit on the overweight side so if Zeus was looking skinny something was probably wrong. Zeus’s blood work looked pretty normal but his x-rays showed thickening of the walls of his intestines and stomach which was confirmed using an ultrasound machine. Zeus went to surgery to have biopsies taken of his stomach and intestinal wall.


Again Zeus got lucky. The small pieces of tissue or biopsies taken from Zeus showed that he had

inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD where the immune system reacts to parasite, food, and bacterial proteins. White blood cells find their way into the walls of the gut. This causes them to become thickened. Intestines that are in this state do not absorb food well. It can also lead to vomiting, diarrhea, low red blood cell counts, decreased protein levels, malnutrition, and weight loss. Zeus was placed on metronidazole for a short period of time and a novel protein diet. Metronidazole is an antibiotic that also has some anti-inflammatory affects as well as kills some of the bacteria that may be causing the problem in the gut. Zeus eventually did very well on diet alone and gained his weight back becoming the big guy he once was.


Zeus was also an indoor/outdoor cat but did not range far from home. In late August of this year Zeus developed a swelling on is muzzle just under his nose. It was presumed that Zeus had developed an abscess on his face possibly from another animal bite. He was given antibiotics and fluids under his skin. He was also given some medications as he was not eating as well as he normally did. Despite treatment, the swelling became worse affecting most of the left side of his face, nose, and mouth.


He was very congested and had a fever. He was also not eating. If Zeus was not eating at all, Zeus must have been feeling really bad. A sample of the puss from Zeus’s face was sent to the lab for a veterinary pathologist to look at it. He was also placed on more antibiotics, pain medication, appetite stimulants, and continued fluids under the skin. A diagnosis of blastomycosis came back from the lab. Blastomyces dermatitidis is a fungus found in soil. It can infect the skin as well as internal organs.


On the skin it causes large abscesses and swelling. It is treated with medications called antifungals. Zeus started treatment on a drug called Itraconazole. Unfortunately these drugs can also cause animals to go off food. Zeus continued to do poorly and would not eat even with the appetite stimulants. The swelling on his face continued to expand causing him to have trouble breathing and his lymph nodes under his

jaw became swollen. A feeding tube was placed in Zeus’s stomach allowing food to be placed directly into his digestive system. Zeus’s luck ran out and over the next 12 hours Zeus continued to decline. He was suffering and his owner’s rightly decided to end his suffering and put him to sleep. Zeus’s battle with blastomycosis lasted only 12 days despite doing everything possible to save his life.


Zeus will be sorely missed by his humane family and the beagle dogs he shared his home with. The team at Concord Chapel will miss him also as he was a part of our lives for 10 years. Rest in peace big guy.



Boston Norris | JULY 2015


   Boston Norris is a 10 year old male, neutered Shih-Tzu that has been living with diabetes mellitus (high blood sugar) for the past 3.5 years.  Diabetes is a common endocrine disease in dogs and cats.  The main symptoms of diabetes are excessive thirst, excessive urination, and weight loss.  Boston was diagnosed with diabetes using blood work and urine results after he started drinking a lot of water and having urinary accidents in the house.  Another symptom that can suggest a dog may have diabetes is the sudden development of cataracts due to sugar being deposited into the lens of the eye.  Boston did develop cataracts after his diabetes was diagnosed.  Urinary tract infections are also common in animals with diabetes as the sugar that gets into the urine makes the bladder a perfect breeding ground for certain types of bacteria.


   Dogs typically have insulin dependent diabetes which is similar to type 1 diabetes in humans.  In this type of diabetes, the pancreas, which normally produces the insulin the body uses to store sugar in the cells of the body, stops producing insulin.  Therefore, these patients need an outside source of insulin to store and process sugar normally.  This insulin usually comes in the form of injections that are given twice daily.  There are many different types of insulins available some of which are the same insulins used by humans.  There are insulins also specifically made for use in dogs and cats that can be purchased through your veterinarian.  Boston takes a veterinary type insulin called Vetsulin. He gets injections twice daily under the skin.  Boston also eats a special food made for diabetic dogs that helps his body normalize his blood sugar levels.  This food may also prevent him from needing higher doses of Vetsulin to keep his diabetes controlled.  


   At first, it was difficult to get Boston’s blood sugar levels under control.  His insulin was switched to Vetsulin which worked much better for Boston.  We see Boston regularly for physical exams and to periodically check his blood sugar levels, organ function, blood cell counts, and urine because of his diabetes.  Boston is a very nice boy, easy to work with, and continues to do well even though he has a lifelong disease.    


Bob | JUNE 2015


   Bob is 4.5 year old male neutered domestic short haired cat that was recently diagnosed with plasma cell pododermatitis.  Plasma cell pododermatitis is a foot pad disease in cats where one or more of the foot pads swell up and become pillow like.  Some of the foot pads may even become purple and ulcerated.

  

 These swollen and possibly ulcerated foot pads can be painful and the affected cat may limp. This disease can affect any cat of any age or gender. 

   Even though this disease may have a recognizable appearance, the cause of the disease is poorly understood.  Veterinary scientists believe that plasma cells (a type of white blood cell) are somehow activated and start producing large amounts of antibodies which attack the tissues of the foot pad.  

   This leads to the swelling, ulceration, and pain.  Blood work performed on cats with this disease usually shows elevated white blood cell counts and high levels of circulating globulins (another name for antibodies).  The problem is that no one really knows what actually activates the plasma cells.  Some studies have linked FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) infection with plasma cell pododermatitis.

   However, many cats with the disease test negative for FIV. Treatment for the disease focuses on modifying the immune systems reaction to the current stimulus. Drugs such as doxycycline, corticosteroids, and cyclosporine can be used to treat this disease as all of these medications have modifying effects on the immune system.  With one or more of these medications, this plasma cell pododermatitis can be managed leading to a more comfortable cat. 

   Bob is currently being treated with a drug called Atopica which is a cyclosporine.  Bob is doing very well at home and his feet are looking much better.  Bob’s human parents say that he is running around and is acting like his normal self again.


Opie | MAY 2015


   May is Pet Cancer Awareness Month.  It is pretty clear that our furry family members can get lumps and bumps on the inside and out just like humans can.  


   Let me introduce you to Opie, who is a virtual tumor factory.  Opie is a 14 year-old German shepherd mix who is currently living with a tumor in her spleen. This mass was diagnosed in December 2014 and she is miraculously still with us.


   Opie’s splenic mass has grown bigger which is normal.  However, it has yet to rupture and start bleeding which is unusual for these types of masses.  Tumors of the spleen are typically hematomas (a noncancerous mass; basically a large blood clot), hemangiomas (benign tumors of the wall of a blood vessel), or  hemangiosarcomas (malignant tumors of the wall of a blood vessel).  


   Based on the fact that Opie is still with us, and the fact that the mass has not spread to her other organs like her liver or lungs, this mass is most likely a hematoma or a hemangioma.   

 

   Splenic masses are very common to dogs, especially German shepherds and their mixes.  Dogs and cats can live without their spleens, and it is typically recommended that the animal have a surgical procedure called a splenectomy where the abdomen is opened up and the entire spleen is removed.  

   

   The entire spleen is then sent to a histopathology lab to diagnose what type of mass the pet has.  In Opie’s case, her owner has elected to not perform a very invasive surgery and let the disease run its course, as Opie is 14 years old, and this is not Opie’s first cancer rodeo.

   Opie has had several surgeries to remove masses called mast cell tumors.  Mast cells are a type of white blood cell that are involved in defending the body against parasites and other pathogens and are involved in the allergic process.  Mast cells can be found in every organ of the body.  Mast cell tumors are a form of cancer where the mast cells overgrow in an unpredictable pattern.  Because mast cells can be found anywhere, mast cell tumors can be found anywhere also.  It is very common to find mast cell tumors in the skin which was the case with Opie.  


   Opie has had surgeries in 2011, 2013, and 2014 to remove multiple mast cell tumors.  Luckily for Opie, all of these masses were completely removed, and she did not need additional treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation after any of these surgeries. 

Opie has also had surgeries to remove a hemangioma from the skin and tissue on her tail (unrelated to the one that may be in her spleen) and to remove a soft tissue sarcoma from the tissue under her skin. Soft tissue sarcomas can be benign or malignant masses that arise from the connective tissue.  


They are usually found in or under the skin, but like mast cell tumors, they can develop anywhere in the body. Opie is also sporting a plethora of benign fatty masses called lipomas that her owner is diligently watching for any signs of growth or change. Opie, the amazing tumor forming dog, can be found hanging out almost daily at Concord Chapel Animal Hospital as she is one of our technician’s pets.  If you are at the hospital, make sure to say “hi” to the old girl.  She loves treats!



Bella | FEBRUARY 2015 


   Bella is a 9 year-old long-haired Dachshund who suddenly developed a bloody nose. Bella’s owners became concerned and took her to MedVet through the emergency department. 

 

   Bella’s owners told the emergency veterinarian that Bella had also been coughing and gagging more over the past 2 months.  The emergency veterinarian performed a physical exam on Bella and noted a red spot over one of her canine teeth but, other than the blood coming from her nose,found nothing else significant. 

 

   Bloody noses in dogs are typically caused by high blood pressure, low platelet counts, clotting problems, cancers, foreign bodies, trauma, inflammation, or infection.  Bella’s blood pressure was checked and found to be normal as was her platelet counts.  Her clotting ability also tested within normal limits.  The emergency veterinarian then recommended CT (computed tomography) scanning Bella’s head and nose or rhinoscopy which would use a camera to look in Bella’s nose.  At this point, the bleeding from Bella’s nose had slowed by using diluted epinephrine in the nostrils and, Bella’s owners decided to take her home and think about their next step. 

 

   Two days later, Bella was brought to Concord Chapel for Dr. Russell to take a look at her nose.  Dr. Russell found a loose, right, upper canine tooth, an open wound above that canine tooth, and pus and blood at the gum line.  She also found traces of blood at the corner of both nostrils and pus coming out of the right nostril.  Dr. Russell thought it was possible that the bleeding from Bella’s nose could be due to a tooth root abscess (infection around the tooth root) that had invaded the nostrils but cancers could not be ruled out. 

   Dr. Russell recommended an oral exam, dental cleaning and removing the diseased teeth under anesthesia.  Bella’s owners decided to proceed with Dr. Russell’s recommendations but, if cancerous masses were found,they would most likely euthanize Bella. Dr. Russell placed Bella on antibiotics and pain medications and scheduled Bella for the dental procedures.


   Dr. Kerr saw Bella next and placed Bella under anesthesia.  First, Dr. Kerr examined Bella’s mouth and found that both upper canine teeth were loose and pus was coming out around both teeth.  Several other teeth in Bella’s mouth were diseased as well.  Dr. Kerr made gingival flaps over both canines and removed those teeth.  

   

   Chunky white pus was found above the teeth and the bone around the tooth completely destroyed, leaving holes that went directly into both nostrils.  More chunky, white pus was found in the nostrils as well.  Long Q-tips, hemostats, and saline flush were used to remove all of the pus from both nostrils, and the gum flaps sutured back over the areas where the canine teeth were removed.  No cancerous masses were noted. 


   The other diseased teeth were also removed and her remaining teeth were cleaned, polished, and treated with fluoride.  Bella did very well under anesthesia and recovered well from her ordeal. 

 
   Dr. Kerr rechecked Bella one week after surgery and then again a month later.  There are now two small defects in the gum where Bella’s upper canine teeth use to be. The medical name for these holes is oronasal fistula or a hole that connects the mouth to the nose.  


   These holes may need to be patched with new gum tissue in the future but, for now, Bella is doing very well.  Bella no longer has bloody noses, is not having any coughing or gagging episodes like she was before, and she is acting like her old self again.  


   She is even playing with her dog toys which she had not done for a long time prior to having her diseased teeth removed. Bella’s owners are so glad that she is acting like herself again and wish they had had her dental procedure performed earlier.  Everyone at Concord Chapel is happy that Bella is doing so well and is glad her story has a happy ending.  



Pumpkin | APRIL 2015


   Spring has sprung and it is the start of baby animal season. In spring time, many of Earth’s creatures start reproducing in order to assure the survival of their species. Cats, like many of these other animals, breed like gang busters in the spring. Even cats as young as 6 months old can breed and reproduce. Kittens and their mothers can be found under porches, under trees, and in barns. If mom is killed or choses to abandon her offspring, you may find yourself with the unfortunate responsibility of mothering these kittens. 


   At Concord Chapel, many kittens are delivered to our doorstep, usually by people who are unsure how to care for them or need to find homes for them. Some of these kittens are able to eat on their own and are using a litter box. Other kittens are were recently born and do not even have their eyes or ears open yet. These kittens are unable to eat on their own and must be bottle fed every 2-4 hours. They also must be stimulated to defecate and urinate. Our Star of the Month is one of these kittens. Pumpkin is 2-3 weeks old and is being bottle fed with kitten milk replacer. Kitten milk replacer is not as beneficial as milk from their mother but it is the ideal substitute. Cow’s milk should not be used. How much milk is needed per kitten per feeding is based on the kitten’s age and weight. Guides for how much kitten milk replacer should be used and how it should be mixed will be found on the packaging. After bottle feeding, a clean, warm, wet cotton ball is used to rub the genital and anal area to stimulate urination and defecation. This simulates what a mother cat would do for her kittens after they were finished nursing. If this is not done, kittens may become constipated and may not empty their bladders. This could be stressful for newborn kitten and potentially lead to illness and death.


   These cute little balls of fur will grow quickly if kept free of disease and with proper nutrition. Kittens’ eyes and ears will open at around 2 weeks of age. Kittens as young as three weeks old will start to play with each other. Kittens can be started on wet kitten food mixed with milk replacer around 4-5 weeks of age. It does not take them long to figure out that the wet stuff that comes out of a can is food and within by the time they are 6-7 weeks old they will even be eating some dry food. At this point, kittens are typically eating on their own,using a litter box, and are ready to go to their forever home.




Trio | MARCH 2015


   Trio is a 3 year old three-legged tuxedo cat.  Trio lost his right rear leg in a car engine accident when he was a kitten.  So when Trio came to see Dr. Kerr because he had  been vomiting for a week, it wasn’t his first  emergency experience.  

 

   Not only was Trio vomiting, he was not eating as well and was lethargic.  Trio also had a habit of eating things he is not supposed to such as his human family’s hair ties.  With that kind of history, the first thought on Dr. Kerr’s mind was what did this cat eat and where was it stuck.  Dr. Kerr first did a physical exam and could not feel anything abnormal in Trio’s intestines, but he was tense and uncomfortable when the front part of his abdomen was palpated.  X-rays were then taken of 


   Trio’s abdomen, and an obvious FB (foreign body) was noted in his cranial abdomen, and it did 


not appear to be a hair tie.  Trio’s owners were called to give them the unfortunate news that their handsome, three legged, furry family member needed surgery to remove what he ate.  Trio had an IV catheter placed and fluids were started to keep him hydrated and safe through surgery.  His blood was tested and was normal.  


   He was then taken to surgery.  A hollow, cylindrical, piece of black rubber was removed from the first part of Trio’s small intestine and a calcified mass of fat was removed from the fat in his abdomen.  No other abnormalities were noted when Dr. Kerr looked at and felt the rest of the organs in Trio’s abdomen.


   Trio did very well after the surgery.  He started eating well again the night of the surgery and has had no vomiting since.  So far Trio has kept his three legged self out of trouble and his family are trying to keep him from eating other foreign objects.  Although, the origin of the piece of rubber removed from Trio’s intestine remains a mystery.


Sven | JANUARY 2015


   Sven is a black and white, 16 week old, domestic long haired kitten who was up for adoption at Concord Chapel Animal Hospital. Sven came to us two months ago as a stray kitten and, like all kittens we are putting up for adoption at Concord Chapel, we test them for FelineLeukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV).  


   Unfortunately for Sven, he tested positive for FIV.  Feline Immunodeficiency Virus or FIV is a viral disease similar to HIV in that the virus attacks white blood cells which are the very cells that are supposed to protect the body against infection.  FIV essentially causes AIDS(acquired immune deficiency syndrome) in cats as HIV causes AIDS in humans.  


   Because a cat’s immune system is impaired when they have FIV, these cats typically become infected with viruses,bacteria, parasites, and fungi that their immune system would normally protect them against.  They then become sick and eventually die from one of these infections. FIV positive cats are also more susceptible to severe oral inflammation and infection, eye diseases, severe weight loss, cancers, and blood diseases.

  

 FIV is spread from cat to cat usually via deep bite wounds.  Indoor/outdoor cats that get into fights with other cats are the most susceptible to contracting FIV.  It is unlikely that a cat will contract FIV through casual contact such as grooming and drinking or eating out of the same bowls.  Unlike HIV, sexual contact is nota major means of transmission of FIV.  

   Rarely, FIV can be spread from a mother cat to her kitten when the kitten is being born or through the mother’s infected milk.  When kittens are nursing, they can also ingest antibodies that their mother is producing against FIV.  These antibodies can stay in a kitten’s body for months. 


   The tests used to detect FIVin cats detect these antibodies. Therefore, kittens that test FIV positive may not actually haveFIV.  These kittens should be tested every 60 days until they are over 6 months old. Sven falls into this category and Sven will be retested again to determine if he really has FIV or not. 


   Adult cats that test positive for FIV, however, typically truly have the disease but, a second different kind of test can be run to make sure.  Cats who have been in a fight with another cat should be tested for FIV at least 60 days after the fight because it can take that long for the disease to progress enough for the test to become positive.


   It can take months to years for an FIV positive cat to start showing symptoms of the disease.  However, an FIV positive cat should see a veterinarian at least twice a year.  They should also be tested for parasites and dewormed appropriately.  They should also be vaccinated as a “normal” cat would be. 


   An FIV positive cat can typically live comfortably and symptom free for months to years as long as they do not get into fights with their other animal housemates and they are not exposed to other diseases.  Cats with FIV should not live with other pets or people that also have compromised or weakened immune systems. 


   This means a person with HIV should not live with an FIV positive cat and an FIV positive cat should not live with anotherFIV positive cat.  This is because immune compromised individuals, whether they be cat or human, are more likely to get infections which will then be amplified at a much greater rate as their immune systems are not keeping the infection at a manageable level.  This puts all the immune compromised pets and people at risk for very serious disease. 


   Any cat owner may ask, “How can I prevent my cat from contracting FIV?”  The simple answer is to keep your cats indoors and keep them out of cat fights.  There is a vaccine available for FIV but it is only currently effective approximately82% of the time.  This means that one in five cats that are vaccinated with the FIV vaccine will still contract FIV when exposed to FIV. 


   Giving your cat the vaccine also presents another problem. Any cat that is vaccinated for FIV will have a “positive” result on any standard FIV test.  This makes it difficult for a veterinarian to know if the cat is actually FIV positive or if it has received the vaccination.  The vaccine available may also put cats at risk for developing vaccine induced cancers called sarcomas.  These types of cancers will ultimately take a cat’s life just as FIV would.  For these reasons, the American Association ofFeline Practitioners does not recommend the FIV vaccine for cats.


   Sven currently is a happy, healthy, and rambunctious kitten.  He shows no signs of disease and is parasite free.  Even though he is currently FIV positive now, there is a very good chance it is only because he nursed from hisFIV positive mother and ingested the FIV antibodies. 


   Sven will be tested for FIV again next month.  In the meantime, Sven is looking for a forever home.  If you are looking for a new fur ball in your life and you feel your home is right for him, Sven is waiting for you at Concord Chapel.

They then become sick and eventually die from one of these infections. FIV positive cats are also more susceptible to severe oral inflammation and infection, eye diseases, severe weight loss, cancers, and blood diseases.

   

   FIV is spread from cat to cat usually via deep bite wounds.  Indoor/outdoor cats that get into fights with other cats are the most susceptible to contracting FIV.  It is unlikely that a cat will contract FIV through casual contact such as grooming and drinking or eating out of the same bowls.  Unlike HIV, sexual contact is nota major means of transmission of FIV.  

  

  Rarely, FIV can be spread from a mother cat to her kitten when the kitten is being born or through the mother’s infected milk.  When kittens are nursing, they can also ingest antibodies that their mother is producing against FIV.  These antibodies can stay in a kitten’s body for months. 


   The tests used to detect FIVin cats detect these antibodies. Therefore, kittens that test FIV positive may not actually haveFIV.  These kittens should be tested every 60 days until they are over 6 months old. Sven falls into this category and Sven will be retested again to determine if he really has FIV or not. 


   Adult cats that test positive for FIV, however, typically truly have the disease but, a second different kind of test can be run to make sure.  Cats who have been in a fight with another cat should be tested for FIV at least 60 days after the fight because it can take that long for the disease to progress enough for the test to become positive.


   It can take months to years for an FIV positive cat to start showing symptoms of the disease.  However, an FIV positive cat should see a veterinarian at least twice a year.  They should also be tested for parasites and dewormed appropriately.  They should also be vaccinated as a “normal” cat would be. 


   An FIV positive cat can typically live comfortably and symptom free for months to years as long as they do not get into fights with their other animal housemates and they are not exposed to other diseases.  Cats with FIV should not live with other pets or people that also have compromised or weakened immune systems. 


   This means a person with HIV should not live with an FIV positive cat and an FIV positive cat should not live with anotherFIV positive cat.  This is because immune compromised individuals, whether they be cat or human, are more likely to get infections which will then be amplified at a much greater rate as their immune systems are not keeping the infection at a manageable level.  This puts all the immune compromised pets and people at risk for very serious disease. 


   Any cat owner may ask, “How can I prevent my cat from contracting FIV?”  The simple answer is to keep your cats indoors and keep them out of cat fights.  There is a vaccine available for FIV but it is only currently effective approximately82% of the time.  This means that one in five cats that are vaccinated with the FIV vaccine will still contract FIV when exposed to FIV. 


   Giving your cat the vaccine also presents another problem. Any cat that is vaccinated for FIV will have a “positive” result on any standard FIV test.  This makes it difficult for a veterinarian to know if the cat is actually FIV positive or if it has received the vaccination.  The vaccine available may also put cats at risk for developing vaccine induced cancers called sarcomas.  These types of cancers will ultimately take a cat’s life just as FIV would.  For these reasons, the American Association ofFeline Practitioners does not recommend the FIV vaccine for cats.


   Sven currently is a happy, healthy, and rambunctious kitten.  He shows no signs of disease and is parasite free.  Even though he is currently FIV positive now, there is a very good chance it is only because he nursed from hisFIV positive mother and ingested the FIV antibodies. 


   Sven will be tested for FIV again next month.  In the meantime, Sven is looking for a forever home.  If you are looking for a new fur ball in your life and you feel your home is right for him, Sven is waiting for you at Concord Chapel.